The World Before This One

The World Before This One The Author Of THE ROUGH FACE GIRL Creates A Magical Coming Of Age Novel Built From Thousands Of Years Of Seneca Legend Now In Paperback Crow Is A Seneca Boy, Coming Of Age In A Time Of War, In A Time Before Stories Cast Out Of The Seneca Tribe, Crow And His Grandmother Struggle Merely To Find Enough Food To Make It Through The Harsh Winter Then Crow Finds A Boulder In The Woods That Startles Him By Speaking The Storytelling Stone Tells Crow The Great Legends Of The Seneca Tales Of The Long Ago Time, When The Sky Women Trod The Above World And A Child Could Alter The Ways Of A People Crow Comes To Realize His Own Power To Effect Change And His Destiny As A Seneca Man But Can The Stone Be Trusted

This professional storyteller lives in Rochester, New York.

❴Reading❵ ➻ The World Before This One Author Rafe Martin – Ultimatetrout.info
  • Paperback
  • 208 pages
  • The World Before This One
  • Rafe Martin
  • English
  • 17 May 2018
  • 9780590379809

10 thoughts on “The World Before This One

  1. says:

    I first bought this in 2014, when an artsy student of mine showed me artwork by the artist who illustrated the book But by the time I got it, I was so busy I put it on a shelf and forgot about it Recently, I was looking for an illustrated book, as well as one I haven t read yet, and I came across this one and decided to give it a go It took me awhile to get used to the cadence of the story and to form a connection with the characters, but the illustrations were beautiful and kept me going And then something shifted when Grandfather Boulder was introduced and suddenly I couldn t put it down I can just picture and hear a Seneca grandfather telling this story It really is quite a beautiful story that reminds me of what should be important in life and how we should respect and care for Mother Earth It reminds us of the power of stories and how they can change the world I m sorry it took me so long to read this, but I m glad I did

  2. says:

    This is a story of a Seneca boy, Crow, who lives with his grandmother outside of their village during wartime The boy spends his time hunting for food One day he encounters a mysterious, speaking boulder The stone starts to tell stories from the past Crow listens to the creation of the world, the legends about the wisdoms of life and the basic rules of existence in harmony with nature and people This experience changes the boy s life The talking boulder passes all his knowledge and memories onto the boy The young Seneca receives the gift of language Crow returns to the village and becomes world s most famous storyteller I fully enjoyed reading this book The author of the book, Rafe Martin, tells the fictional story which incorporates the forgotten art of storytelling The reader is exposed to ancient Seneca legends and myths The introduction written by Peter Jamison, a Seneca Elder, prepares the reader for the time travel and explains the storytelling tradition among the Native American tribes While reading this book I enjoyed the beautiful illustrations of cut paper sculptures by Calvin Nichols They ignited my imagination and enhanced my reading experience The book introduced me to the fascinating Native American legends and myths As an adult, I find this book very interesting and I believe that middle school readers would enjoy as well.

  3. says:

    Crow is a young man who lives with his aging Grandmother Their family, once a tightly knit, thriving unit, has fallen apart in recent months, and now the two struggle to survive together Quietly shunned by the other people of their tribe, they retreat to the outskirts of the village, outside the safety and security of the cluster of longhouses As Crow grows and becomes stronger, his Grandmother tells him that it is now time for him to learn to hunt and to become a man Crow begins hunting birds in the nearby woods, and quickly develops a sharp eye and quick arm On one of his hunting forays, Crow discovers a boulder that speaks to him, and begins to share with him stories from the beginning of all knowledge, from the world before the present As Crow listens, he is enraptured by the tales, and soon discovers that these stories are changing his deepest, inner self Crow takes the stories back to his people, and they begin to change the life of the tribe as well Crow and his grandmother quickly become cast out no longer, and find happiness with their people once again In this novel formed from ancient Seneca legends, Rafe Martin constructs a touching coming of age story filled with beauty and respect for the wisdom of the past Crow s troubles, while superficially uncommon in the lives of everyday teens, speak to deeper themes of survival and heartache Crow and his grandmother are simply trying to find their places among humankind, a concept that resonates in the hearts of most people in the modern world This book is recommended.

  4. says:

    A story about stories I picked this up for a dollar at half price books and decided to read it right away It was an enjoyable read and introduction to Seneca folklore and mythology If you like Native American folklore and mythology, or just folktales in general, you will enjoy this one Using a story of a boy and his grandmother struggling to survive and find their way back into the good grace of the village as a way to introduce and weave traditional Seneca stories was both creative and well done.

  5. says:

    Storyteller Rafe Martin has written a book about storytelling and stories derived from the traditional stories of the Seneca people The central story about the storytelling stone serves as the frame in which to share numerous other stories As outcast young Crown Gaqka becomes his people s first storyteller, the importance of listening and building bridges through stories are emphasized Book Pairings Grace Lin s three children s novels starting with Where the Mountain Meets the Moon follows a similar format of an over arching story with original Asian folk tale inspired stories told throughout is a great children s book pairing for lovers of the format and folk tales.Louis Erdrich s children s book series starting with The Birchbark House includes some storytelling along with daily life of an Ojibwe family in Wisconsin, inspired by her own genealogy A Crack in the Sea by H.M Bouman is a fantasy story that incorporates storytelling and history that will appeal to those you are intrigued by those aspects of the story.

  6. says:

    Thrift store find wouldn t have read it otherwise as not interested in mythology and burnt out on historical fiction But I do like Martin s The Rough Face Girl Well Glad I read this The boy listening to the old stories comes alive He laughs, fibs, asks questions when the stories told by the rock don t make sense, forgets to ask his grandmother for her stories he s not a young warrior, noble savage type In fact, none of the characters are And the stories are interesting Personally, 3.5 stars, but rounded up because I think other people would like this , and the cut paper pictures are impressive, too Introduction and note are persuasive that this is True to Seneca history.

  7. says:

    I have met Rafe on two occasions The first time he told the story of The Rough Face Girl he is a wonderful storyteller both live and in books The second time I met him I got this book This is his first novel, which combines the story of a Seneca boy, Crow, with Long Ago Time tales told by the Storytelling Stone to the boy The boy learns the stories and is given the task of repeating the tales to his people The novel is told beautifully and has gorgeous cut paper sculpture illustrations intertwined with the story.

  8. says:

    Oh just brilliant I loved the framework of the Gaqka and the Talking Stone story for all the better known Seneca stories, and how the context gave new meaning to the old stories Mad props to Rafe Martin for making a Stone such an awesome characterand to the illustrator for the raddest paper sculptures ever to grace a juvenile lit book.

  9. says:

    A very interesting book it gives a lot of philosophical views of life and is a bit like a native american tale but it still has problems in it as all books do When I finished it, I looked at the world in an entirely different way This book is a need to read for everybody.

  10. says:

    What a fun book So many good reminders, in particular to treat others the way you yourself would want to be treated I plan on getting this as a harbound book for the shelf This one is worthy of reading again and again over time.

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