Unsettling Truths

Unsettling Truths You Cannot Discover Lands Already InhabitedInjustice Has Plagued American Society For Centuries And We Cannot Move Toward Being A Just Nation Without Understanding The Root Causes That Have Shaped Our Culture And InstitutionsIn This Prophetic Blend Of History, Theology, And Cultural Commentary, Mark Charles And Soong Chan Rah Reveal The Far Reaching, Damaging Effects Of The Doctrine Of Discovery In The Fifteenth Century, Official Church Edicts Gave Christian Explorers The Right To Claim Territories They Discovered This Was Institutionalized As An Implicit National Framework That Justifies American Triumphalism, White Supremacy, And Ongoing Injustices The Result Is That The Dominant Culture Idealizes A History Of Discovery, Opportunity, Expansion, And Equality, While Minority Communities Have Been Traumatized By Colonization, Slavery, Segregation, And DehumanizationHealing Begins When Deeply Entrenched Beliefs Are Unsettled Charles And Rah Aim To Recover A Common Memory And Shared Understanding Of Where We Have Been And Where We Are Going As Other Nations Have Instituted Truth And Reconciliation Commissions, So Do The Authors Call Our Nation And Churches To A Truth Telling That Will Expose Past Injustices And Open The Door To Conciliation And True Community

Mark Charles, a man of Navajo and Dutch American descent, is a speaker, writer, and consultant on the complexities of American history, race, culture, and faith He is the author of the blog Reflections from the Hogan and was the Washington, DC, correspondent and columnist for Native News Online He has served on the boards of the Christian Community Development Association CCDA and the

❰PDF❯ ✩ Unsettling Truths Author Mark  Charles – Ultimatetrout.info
  • Paperback
  • 224 pages
  • Unsettling Truths
  • Mark Charles
  • 03 March 2017
  • 9780830845255

10 thoughts on “Unsettling Truths

  1. says:

    The past few years have seen many contributions from people of color regarding their experience in America in light of its heritage of white supremacy, especially as it relates to the Christian faith this work is an important contribution to that end, featuring the perspective of a Native American regarding the doctrine of discovery and its implications in Western civilization ever since.The author brings to the fore the principle which undergirded the colonization of America the doctrine of discovery, enshrined in papal bulls granting the Portuguese and Spanish dominion over any lands they would discover, even though the lands they discovered already had Native populations within it It was presumed that the Europeans discovering these lands were superior in belief and nature to those who would be discovered, and from this principle would come the ungodly, dehumanizing, and genocidal treatment of the Native Americans at the hands of Europeans from the 16th century into the 20th The author describes how the doctrine of discovery became enshrined in American legal precedent in the Johnson vs M Intosh Supreme Court decision in 1823, and has remained live and active to the present, used in a justification of denying a Native claim to land in New York in 2005.The author speaks of the transgressions of the nation the forced deportation of Natives from their lands to places out West the dire conditions of the reservations the massacres at Sand Creek and Wounded Knee the boarding schools and the desire to get the Indian out of the man He likewise views Western civilization through critical lenses its white supremacy, its Christendom and Christianity s compromise with empire, its dysfunctional theology of domination and conquest, its colonialism, its claims to exceptionalism, and the ugly side of its heroes, especially Abraham Lincoln He also speaks of trauma and its effects He yearns for conciliation in truth.It s a challenging read for the white American, but a very necessary one Many will be offended at the way in which the author approaches many of the subjects, but the reader ought to step out of his or her perspective and consider how it would all look to Native Americans whose legitimacy in the land was denied for nearly 400 years, and to thus be open to the prospect that he is not wrong, and has a clearer view to an ugliness we would rather not see The author s desire for truth in conciliation is good, wise, and appropriate That conciliation would, no doubt, lead to a restoration of some land to the Natives But it is hard to square the posture of the author to be working for an America for everyone with wide ranging thoroughgoing land claims that would come at the expense of plenty of others who are here in America The means by which land was taken from Native Americans was, without an argument, unjust and wrong Then again, for generations before Europeans came and even afterward , Natives would dispossess other Natives through war Based on genetics and records it would seem that human history is one long series of migrations or invasions in many instances, the newcomers genetically assimilated into the local populations, with either the newcomers or the locals assimilating culturally into the other yet in many other instances, the newcomers wiped out the local populations and replaced them on the land For that matter, the Bible itself testifies to the same piece of land being possessed, at different times, by different peoples So what do you do with land claims and land ownership I do not think it is an easy question with an easy answer, and worthy of meditation.Regardless, invaluable and important reading Highly recommended galley received as part of early review program

  2. says:

    Rah and Charles explore US history, church history, sociology, and Scripture in an effort to help us understand the origin of our current racial, economic, and religious upheaval The co authors illustrate how the church has historically supported the state in the state s quest to expand human kingdoms and human power at the expense of human life and human flourishing Here s a quote from chapter four Christendom is the prostitution of the church to the empire thatcreated a church culture of seeking power rather than relationships.Jesus laid down his life, but the empire must save its life Jesus emptied himself, but the empire must protect and expand itself There is a fundamental conflict between the goal of the earthly empire and the direction of the kingdom of God Greatness in the world and greatness in the kingdom of God stand in opposition This book is profound and powerful And FYI as a Caucasian, it s not an easy read It is essential.

  3. says:

    This is an important, powerful book that traces the Church s quest for power from Constantine through the Doctrine of Discovery to the founding of the USA to today An exhaustive illustration of how the American Church has been unable and unwilling to surrender its attachment to White Supremacist ideology And running throughout, there s a hope that if the American church will listen to the voices we ve pushed aside, it s not too late.

  4. says:

    This review is for a Launch Team Edition The forthcoming publishing date is November 5, 2019.This book is about the Doctrine of Discovery and the Christian Church It explores how this doctrine has oppressed nations and people of color It presents a history that has not been put forth in the textbooks and is very well documented.The authors have created a much needed look at the Church s role in the Doctrine of Discovery It is a book that I believe Church s should read, discuss and take action on as assistants as determined by the leaderships of people of color.This was a book I did not want to put down and brought forth lament, tears, and the desire to make a difference I highly recommend it

  5. says:

    I devoured this in one sitting The use of the word unsettling in the title is very apt Even as someone who has read and studied quite a bit on the history of race, and especially racial dynamics in American history, I was still challenged and provoked by many of the discussions in Charles and Rah s new book.The authors go right for the jugular in this historical summary, making a bold case that the Doctrine of Discovery provided a racially structured, white supremacist foundation for everything that America would become The impacts of this doctrine are traced through the Puritans, the founding documents, the treatment of Native peoples in the 19th century, and onward into our day.Personally, I wonder if a few of the historical assertions are overstated I think there is a nuanced way to understand the rise of Christendom during and after Constantine, for example However, the reason this book gets a confident 5 stars from me, is not because I uncritically agree with every argument, but rather because of the powerful way the book made me wrestle with historical and theological ideas There is surely something to the narrative that the authors have laid out, even if one quibbles with specifics, and we ignore their argument to our peril.Personally, the chapters challenging the historical narrative around Lincoln, the discussion of how America has really never needed to deal with losing a war, and especially the concept of historical trauma, were all paradigm shifters for me The idea that most white folks in America are suffering from collective trauma regarding the historical atrocities we benefit from today was a powerful argument, and from my perspective, provides much healthier explanatory power than the popular idea of white fragility I m deeply grateful that this book exists, and will certainly be returning to it in the future.

  6. says:

    I really appreciated the content and the perspectives in this book The most illuminating chapters for me were, by far, the ones toward the end of the book, where the authors unpack the complex legacy of Abraham Lincoln This is history that we all need to be reading and engaging with For the content, I d give this book four stars.The delivery and writing style were not as strong as I wished they would be for a subject this important The writing felt stilted wooden at times, which is perhaps due to the fact that it was coauthored I would absolutely recommend this book to folks who are passionate about this subject, because I think that people who really want to listen will stick it out But I would not necessarily give this book to someone who is skeptical unsympathetic toward the concerns of Native American peoples I think the delivery would not be compelling enough for them I would, however, urge anyone to pick up this book and read the last chapters on Lincoln Those chapters were compelling, well presented, and a good challenge to those who have not considered the legacy of men such as Lincoln thanks to Netgalley and IVP for this ARC

  7. says:

    I hope to write a longer review later but in the interim This book ought to be required reading for all students of US history and all students of church history Additionally, the final two chapters, need to be incorporated in any conversation about racial conciliation in the US.NOTE ON THE PUBLISHER This book was published by InterVarsity press As a rule I work to avoid purchasing books from that publisher due to their stance on LGBT employees you can check it out here In this case I chose to purchase the book because I am familiar with the lead author Mark Charles and I support the work he does with Native American, Indiginous, and minority rights within the US and the Church If anyone is interested in the content of text but is very understandably unwilling to support the publisher you can find most but not quite all of the salient content in this talk by the lead author

  8. says:

    The following is the review I posted on Goodreads This review is for a Launch Team Edition The forthcoming publishing date is November 5, 2019.This book is about the Doctrine of Discovery and the Christian Church It explores how this doctrine has oppressed nations and people of color It presents a history that has not been put forth in the textbooks and is very well documented.The authors have created a much needed look at the Church s role in the Doctrine of Discovery It is a book that I believe Church s should read, discuss and take action on as assistants as determined by the leaderships of people of color.This was a book I did not want to put down and brought forth lament, tears, and the desire to make a difference I highly recommend it

  9. says:

    This caused me to think about race relations in many ways I hadn t yet I ll still be processing for a while all the ways that the United States needs to heal from its sins, as stated in this book However, there is not an objective stance attempted, so it makes for bad history There is not a fair assessment of what it means to be God s people, or an honest look at the God ordained genocides of the Old Testament, so it makes for bad theology It is a passionate cry for justice, a scathing denunciation of all whiteness, a look at US history through the eyes of a highly educated Native descendant an honest and fair assessment of these topics, it is not.

  10. says:

    This text offers the hope that healing can occur when unsettling truths are confronted For centuries we have kept hidden the stories of oppressed people in our society We have embraced the stories of success and exceptionalism rather than engaging the narrative of suffering and oppression This obsession with the self elevation of the American church and American society reflects an absence of truth telling And the absence of truth has resulted in the presence of injustice Charles and Rah

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